The sixth of April 2020

goats

My whole life I have been a square peg in a round hole. I always marched to the beat of my own drum, I always looked for the road less traveled, and never tried too hard to fit in. I saw these quirks as my strengths in life, and many times they have been strengths and are what makes me who I am.

However, if there was any time to bravely be a sheep, it is now. Listen to the scientists, listen to the health experts, wash your hands, stay inside, wear a mask, keep away from others and you will save lives. It is that simple. Your time to shine, to party, to interact, to hug and embrace will come again, so long as we all do our part now.

The eighteenth of March 2020

pigs

Social interactions are a little weird lately. The very few times I have ventured out, I have made sure to keep a safe distance, even from my good friends. These are simple adjustments we all have to make to stay safe. Social distancing supports your community and keeping that 2m or 6 foot distance will help stop the spread. We will all be able to share in an epic high five and hug eventually, but for now keep your distance and wash your hands.

The twelfth of July 2019

goats

Earlier this year, the twelfth of February to be precise, I reported that a friend of mine in San Francisco worked in an office that employed a herd of goats to do some landscaping around that building. Indeed, goats can digest all sorts of plants that are poisonous and quite a nuisance to humans. In fact, the digestive and grazing abilities of goats are now being employed to fight wild fires in California. With increasing wild fires brought on by the climate crisis, herds of goats are increasingly being called upon to clear out brush and areas at high risk of fires. Using goats in this way is totally green, as herbicides can be detrimental to the environment, and mowing equipment uses fossil fuels and creates air and noise pollution. Additionally, goat herds are low risk and more economical – in Laguna City, California where goats have been clearing brush for nearly twenty years a safety report estimates that a man-powered clearing crew costs $28,000 per acre while a herd of goats costs only $500. Goats may not be able to solve all of our problems, or the climate crisis, but every effort definitely helps!

From empathy to environmentalism – aren’t goats amazing?