The twenty third of March 2020

goats

Well, as the world is locking down and preparing for the great waiting out of the corona catastrophe, I once again am pausing March of Pigs to bring you a bit of history. I am not sure where this originated from, but one of my friends sent it along and it is too good not to share.

If you are reading this blog, I hope that you and your loved ones are safe and well and that you have a comfy place to shelter and access to all that you need to get through.

The twenty second of March 2020

pigs

Happy Mother’s Day for UK moms (USA moms too, although Mother’s Day is observed in May across the Atlantic).

It is said that a pig is pregnant for three months, three weeks and three days. Typically, a Mama pig gives birth to about ten piglets, and she can have up to three litters per year! That’s a lot of piglets! It is advisable to keep male (boar) and female (sow) adult pigs separated to limit over-breeding.

Here is wishing all of the hard working mamas out there (all mamas are hard working mamas of course) a wonderful Sunday, hopefully inside, not going anywhere, and washing your hands.

The sixteenth of March 2020

goats, pigs

It seems strange to keep writing little things and posting pictures of pigs and then goats, but here we are. I assure you, I fully intend to carry on; however, at some point, I may run out of photographs. So, please send me your goat photographs, pig photographs, and whatever else you got to goat.of.the.day.blog@gmail.com

That said, I have been told to limit all non-essential social contact for at least three months. It is really hard to have to stop going to work and doing a lot of things I love to do out and about and in the community, BUT maybe something wonderful will come out of all of that. Maybe, with all of the time I will create something beautiful, or develop a new skill, or read and learn about fantastic things. And most importantly, I will be doing my part to stop the spread of the coronavirus. What a time to be alive.

The fifth of March 2020

goats, pigs

Meet Avery, the official spokespig of the Haven Zoo. She is a friendly, miniature pot-bellied pig who enjoys a few special privileges such as spending time in doors. She helped promote the Haven before they acquired the land that the goat herd, pigs, llamas, donkey, horses and a few primates now enjoy. When she is not promoting the Haven, she enjoys sleeping, eating, hanging out with her puppy friends, and getting into shenanigans like opening cabinets and rifling through the trash. To be fair, I also enjoy sleeping, eating, hanging out with puppies and shenanigans too. Avery is such a character that even her parrot friend has learned to yell “Avery!”

The fourth of March 2020

goats, pigs

Not only is The Haven Zoo home to a herd of lovely goats, but it has also given a home to a few pigs as well. Meet Logan (left) and Delilah (right), representing half of a foursome of goats that the Haven rescued from an extreme hoarding incident in Kentucky. Authorities found 458 pot-bellied pigs being kept, most malnourished and in a state of distress. Sadly, the farm had been opened with the intention of rescuing the pigs but breeding got way out of hand. Fortunately, the Haven was able to step in and rescue a few pigs who now have a lovely pasture to roam around in rain or shine.

To support the Haven and its efforts to provide animals with a good home, a nutritious diet and access to veterinary care please consider making a donation.

The first of March 2020

goats

Goats are fantastic, but sometimes it is good to shake things up. Therefore, the next thirty-one days will feature a pig of the day, rather than a goat of the day. Don’t worry, we will soon return to the genus Capra but for one month will celebrate the genus Sus.

The twenty ninth of February 2020

goats

As you likely know – today is an extra day. The practice started over 2,000 years ago when Julius Caesar developed the Julian Calendar with the assistance of an Alexandrian astronomer, Sosigenes. Basically, the earth makes a full rotation around the sun every 365.25 days and did not fit neatly into a specific calendar or 24 hour cycle. So, it was decided that every four years they would add an extra day to make up for the extra quarter day. You can tell it’s a leap year if the last two digits of the year are divisible by four, except for century years. For a century year (e.g. 1900, 2000) to be a leap year it must be divisible by 400. So 2000 was a leap year, but 2100 will not be. Without leap years, eventually February would be a summer month in the northern hemisphere! Make the most of the extra day today.

The twenty eighth of February 2020

goats

Don’t be afraid to age.

Tao Porchon-Lynch

The final wisdom from yogi Tao Porchon-Lynch on how to live a long and full life celebrates the journey we are all on. So often, it is easy to think that once you pass certain milestones or age numbers that some abilities and possibilities slip away. Maybe some do, but other abilities and possibilities make themselves known and available. It is a wonderful thing to be alive, and never take it for granted.